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Change Team: 
Simple Flash Card Test to Detect Concussions
by posted 08/29/2015

This was an article from earlier this year.  It gives an interesting look at evaluating potential concussions.  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/11/a-2-minute-test-to-detect-concussions/?_r=0

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New Social Networking Site Just for Athletes
by posted 04/04/2015

In today's issue of the KC Star page A6 is an article about a new local startup social network website just for athletes.  It is designed to basically provide one-stop "shopping" for athletes  for "content, careers and connections".  They also have a mobile app for both Android and iOS.  http://t.co/semJyj6imk

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ACT/SAT Tips
by posted 03/15/2014

The writing component of the ACT/SAT will not be used to determine NCAA Eligibility.

You are eligible for a fee waiver for the NCAA Eligibility Center if you have received a waiver for the SAT/ACT fee.

The 
#NCAAEligibilityCenter will use best scores from each section of SAT/ACT to determine best cumulative score.
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10 Tips for Unsigned Seniors (Class 2014)
by posted 03/15/2014

#1 – Put together your Student-Athlete Resume

#2 – The #1 rule to remember is that coaches MUST see you play in order to be interested in recruiting you, either in person or on film. If you don’t have any offers and nobody has come out to see you play, your main goal is to get coaches to evaluate your film.

#3 – When researching and contacting schools, you MUST figure out which assistant coach is in charge of recruiting your town, position, grade, etc. Each coaching staff splits recruiting responsibilities, so your priority is to find out which coach would be your ‘recruiting coach.’

#4 – Talk to your prep coaches and see if they would be able to call some schools for you. What level do they think you would be able to play at? Do they know any college coaches who are at that level who may be able to give you a quick evaluation? Would your coaches be willing to make some cold calls for you?

#5 – Start contacting the local schools, schools within your state. 

#6 – If possible, try to evaluate which school lacks depth at your position. Recruiting decisions are based on timing, it will be difficult to get your foot in the door at a school that is stacked at your position. Coaches are much more likely to evaluate your film if they are in need of a player just like you.

#7 – Would you consider starting at a Junior College and transferring to a Division I or II school in a year or two? Many Division I and II programs put effort into scouting Junior College programs.

#8 – If you have no scholarship offers would you be interested in joining the team as a walk-on and work to secure non-athletic scholarships or student loans?

#9 – Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center if you haven’t already. It is a MANDATORY step, and a sign of maturity to coaches that you’ve already begun the process.

#10 – Get a copy of your unofficial transcript ready as well as your SAT/ACT scores. Once coaches are interested in you, the next step will be to evaluate if you can qualify academically.



 
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Can Junior Colleges Offer Athletic Scholarships?
by posted 03/15/2014

You can receive athletic scholarships to some Junior Colleges to include tuition, fees, room, board, books, course-related materials and transportation costs one time per academic year. Each school varies with what type of athletic scholarship aid they are able to offer—ranging from full scholarships to partial aid to none. Each institution belonging to the NJCAA can choose to compete on the Division I, II or III level in designated sports. Division I colleges may offer full athletic scholarships, Division II colleges are limited to awarding tuition, fees and books, and Division III institutions may provide no athletically related financial assistance. However, NJCAA colleges that do not offer athletic aid may choose to participate at the Division I or II level if they so desire. If you are looking into starting your athletic career at a Junior College contact the coaches ateach school to learn more about what they are able to offer in terms of scholarship opportunities.
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Is your JR year your biggest year to get noticed?
by posted 02/21/2014

Q: Is your Junior year your biggest year to get noticed by college coaches?

A: Yes, your junior year is a key time to be making a name for yourself, a key time to get your play on film for coaches to evaluate and a key time to make sure you’re taking the right classes and finishing with the right grades in order to qualify academically. But, understand that your junior year is never the beginning or end of the process for you!

Coaches are beginning their research during your freshman and sophomore years. They are getting
regional scouting reports from trusted sources about potential players in the state, region and nation. They are noticing underclassmen while out on the road evaluating upperclassmen players they are currently recruiting. They are getting tips from their network of high school and club coaches in the state and region. They are building lists of potential recruits when you are in 9th and 10th grade, even before they are able to contact you legally.

You can’t wait until your junior year to get focused if you are trying to play college sports.

Coaches won’t wait until the summer before your junior year to start doing their research, they’re working way ahead of schedule before they can potentially recruit you and call you. You don’t have to be a starter or on varsity as a freshman, but you must be focused.

On the flip side, scholarship slots, commits and depth chart projections are fluid. The needs of coaches, position-by-position, change often. Most staffs are still finding new players to recruit, even seniors. You may be just hitting your growth spurt, developing physically, may have recently moved into the area, may have just gotten their film or participated in a tournament or game. I have worked with staffs who have offered seniors just hours or days before Signing Day, depending on what their other recruits do.

Rosters (and commitment lists) are often fluid. Players graduate, can’t qualify academically, leave school early, quit, get injured… needs of the coaching staff change and sometimes that means finding new players to recruit, including seniors and Junior College players.

Your junior year is a big year but not necessarily any more important than your sophomore or senior year. It may be your time to step into a starting job or a time to earn more playing time! Make the most of it!

It’s also critical to be in good academic standing as a junior, you don’t want coaches to eliminate you from scholarship consideration because of poor grades! Make sure you are taking the current courses and are on track to graduate and qualify.
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NCAA Eligibility Center
by posted 01/30/2014

Students who want to play any sport at the collegiate level must be completely registered at http://t.co/aDEk2puTis in order to receive an NLI. 
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NCAA Eligibility Center & SAT/ACT Scores
by posted 01/25/2014

Remember to use Code #9999 to have your scores sent to the NCAA Eligibilty Center when you register for your exams!
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Division II Academic Eligibility Requirements
by NCAA posted 11/01/2013

Any core courses used toward your initial eligibility must be completed prior to full-time collegiate enrollment. To be eligible to receive athletics aid (scholarship), practice and compete during your first year, you must:

• Graduate from high school;

• Complete these 16 core courses:
    • 3years of English;
    • 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher);
    • 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school);
    • 3 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical science;
    • 2 years of social science;
    • 4 years of additional core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, comparative religion or        philosophy);

• Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses; and

• Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. For individuals enrolling at a college or university in Puerto Rico, earn a combined Prueba de Aptitud Academica score of 730.

Division II Qualifier

Being a qualifier enables you to:

• Practice and compete for your college or university during your first year of college;
• Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and
• Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your academic eligibility from year-to-year.

Division II Partial Qualifier

You will be considered a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed above, but you have graduated from high school and meet one of the following:

• The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68; or
• Completion of the 16 core courses with a 2.000 core-course grade-point average.

As a partial qualifier, you:

• Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college;
• Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college;
• Cannot compete during your first year of college; and
• Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your academic eligibility from year-to-year.

Division II
Nonqualifier

You will be considered a nonqualifier if you do not meet qualifier or partial-qualifier requirements.

As a
nonqualifier, you:

• Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;
• Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; and
• Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your academic eligibility from year-to-year.

​For more information about the NCAA Eligibility Center visit their website at www.eligibilitycenter.org
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NCAA Eligibility Center
by posted 10/30/2013

What is the website for the NCAA Eligibility Center? Is it mandatory that I register?

Yes, in order to play either NCAA DI or DII sports you must be cleared through the NCAA Eligibility Center. It’s best to register early in your junior year to make sure that you are meeting the mandatory requirements, scheduling the accepted core courses and setting yourself up to qualify in time to enroll as a freshman in college. The fee is $70 for US, US Territories and Canadian students and $120 for international students.

LINK: EligibilityCenter.org

The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA DI and DII.
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How do I attract more interest if I’m not playing well?
by posted 10/16/2013

Q: How do I attract interest when I’m not playing well?

A: SIMPLE! If you aren’t playing well, you won’t get much interest! Too many players focus on the recruiting process instead of focusing on becoming a great player. Here’s what you need to do:

#1- Focus on fundamental drills. Get drills from your position coach, and do them every day. Put in extra work. Every day. Master the simple skills of your position. Dedicate your offseason to getting ahead academically and your training.

#2- Develop mental toughness. You may feel like everyone else is getting recruited and you aren’t. Put that energy into your fundamentals. Out-tough the more skilled players! Be the best at the really simple things—it’s the really simple things that win games and get players recruited.

#3- All players develop on their own time! You don’t need 50 scholarship offers, you need to find that one coach who believes in you. There are plenty of college athletes who were late bloomers. Focus on developing your position-specific skills, strength and speed and doing the footwork to find that coach who sees something in you and is willing to take a chance.

#4- How can you separate yourself and make yourself different? You can get an edge by doing the dirty work that other players don’t want to do—rebounding, special teams, playing defense, blocking, film, playbook junkie, etc. Master a skill that helps win games that most players don’t want to do. Dive for loose balls, block shots, hustle, be the unsung hero who knows how to make plays instead of always looking for the spotlight. Coaches recognize players who hustle. They LOVE players who hustle.

​#5- Think about starting your college career at a Junior College. If you aren’t getting the offers you want out of high school, attend a Junior College for a year or two to give yourself some extra time to develop and start the recruiting process over.
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When NCAA College Coaches May Contact You
by posted 10/09/2013

Sports other than Men’s Basketball, Women’s Basketball, Football, Ice Hockey (M/W) and Women’s Gymnastics

DIVISION I

SOPHOMORE YEAR

RECRUITING MATERIALS
• You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.

TELEPHONE CALLS
• You may make calls to the coach at your expense only.
• College coach cannot call you.

OFF-CAMPUS CONTACT
• None allowed.

OFFICIAL VISIT
• None allowed.

UNOFFICIAL VISIT
• You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits, except during a dead period.

JUNIOR YEAR

RECRUITING MATERIALS
•You may begin receiving September 1 of your junior year.

TELEPHONE CALLS
•You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

COLLEGE COACHES MAY CALL YOU
• Once per week starting July 1 after your junior year.

OFF-CAMPUS CONTACT
• Allowed starting July 1 after your junior year.

OFFICIAL VISIT
• None allowed.

UNOFFICIAL VISIT
• You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits, except during a dead period.

SENIOR YEAR

RECRUITING MATERIALS
• Allowed.

TELEPHONE CALLS
• You may make calls to the coach at your expense

COLLEGE COACHES MAY CALL YOU
• Once per week beginning July 1.
• Unlimited calls the day after you sign an NLI, written offer of admission and/or financial aid; OR the day after the college receives a financial deposit from you.

OFF-CAMPUS CONTACT
• Allowed.

OFFICIAL VISIT
• Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year.
• You may make only one official visit per college and up to a maximum of five official visits to Division I colleges. There is no limit to official visits to Division II colleges.

UNOFFICIAL VISIT
• You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits, except during a dead period.

EVALUATION AND CONTACTS
• Up to seven times during your senior year.
• Unlimited number of contacts and evaluation the day after you sign an NLI, written offer of admission and/or financial aid; OR the day after the college receives a financial deposit from you.

HOW OFTEN CAN A COACH SEE ME OR TALK TO ME OFF THE COLLEGE’S CAMPUS?
• A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior
year.

DIVISION II

RECRUITING MATERIALS
• You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires at any time.
• A coach may begin sending you printed recruiting materials June 15 before your junior year in high school.

TELEPHONE CALLS
• No limit on number of calls by college coach beginning June 15 before your junior year.
• You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

OFF-CAMPUS CONTACT
• A college coach can have contact with you or your parents/legal guardians off the college’s campus beginning June 15 before your junior year.
• No limit on number of contacts off campus.

UNOFFICIAL VISITS
• You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time, except during a dead period.

OFFICIAL VISITS
• You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year.
• You may make only one official visit per college and up to a maximum of five official visits to Division I colleges. There is no limit to official visits to Division II colleges.

DIVISION III

RECRUITING MATERIALS
• You may receive printed materials any time.

TELEPHONE CALLS
• No limit on number of calls or when they can be made by the college coach.
• You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

OFF-CAMPUS CONTACT
• A college coach may begin to have contact with you and your parents/legal guardians off the college’s campus after your junior year.

UNOFFICIAL VISITS
• You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time.

OFFICIAL VISITS
• You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year.
• You may make only one official visit per college and up to a maximum of five official visits to Division I colleges. There is no limit to official visits to Division III colleges.
 
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